A Shadowed Path Podcast Episode 5: A Very Heavy Metal (and Punk Rock!) Holiday

Aww yeah..bust out yer devil horns, shit's gettin loud for this episode! I couldn't bear to think of playing standard holiday music for you, so I dug deep into my rocker chick past to bring you some tasty licks from my heavy metal and punk rock stacks of wax. Air guitar!



This first track, Fast As A Shark off the Restless and Wild album by Accept has tickled my funny bone since 1986 when I heard it for the first time. See, I'm a big lover of polar opposites and dichotomy, and well, this track has both in spades. And what better way to wake everyone up than with a little needle scratching...and not the kind that goes with Hip Hop.


Ramping up the hilarity, we quickly went into Christmas with the Devil by Spinal Tap. Shown below are both sides of the picture disc which is also hilarious.



Keeping the metal energy high, but with a twist, we went into Symphonic Metal versions of two classic holiday tracks by Orion's Reign. This Greek metal band are new to me, and I highly recommend checking them out! 

Orion's Reign
Now it's time for books...it was difficult to narrow the choices down to just a small selection of favorites. I wouldn't go as far as to call this a gift guide for the metal/punk book lovers on your holiday gift-giving lists, but make of it what you will...

Here are two of my absolute favorite books EVER, and I really mean that. First is And I Don't Want To Live This Life by Deborah Spungen. This is of course the tumultuous true life story of Nancy Spungen, which I blogged about in this post. I said it before, and I'll say it again, even if you only have a casual interest in Sid & Nancy, you will be so taken in by her mother's heart-wrenching account of life with (and without) Nancy. Powerful stuff. 

Then you can lighten the mood with this true telling of life on the road with Alice Cooper in Billion Dollar Baby by Bob Greene. An absolutely fantastic read (and fantastically RARE!), this is truly a special gift for the fellow Alice fiends out there.


 From here we move on to the Punk Rock section of the podcast. Where my Ramones heads at? Got a couple of great ones for you here. Dee Dee Ramone wrote a "novel" called Chelsea Horror Hotel which probably has a lot more truth than fiction in it. Then if you're digging the non-fiction vibe I'm throwin' down you can check out Hey, Ho, Let's Go; The Story of The Ramones by Everett True.

Following that is one of my most favorite rock autobiographies; Rotten: No Irish, No Blacks, No Dogs by John Lydon. It's exactly what you would expect coming from the famed lead singer of the Sex Pistols, but much, much more.


Lastly, if you want a thorough account of the first days of Punk seen through the eyes of rock journalist Legs McNeil, you MUST pick up Please Kill Me: The Uncensored Oral History of Punk it will not disappoint. Shown here (from left to right) are the brand new 20th Anniversary edition and the first (UK) edition respectively. Don't be a tosser, grab one and go!


Let's get back to the music now, with a little-known "holiday" track from The White Stripes called Candy Cane Children from 2010 (see last photo). Moving right on with the Triple Track of this episode with Joey Ramone's Spirit In My House, then perhaps a couple of "mainstream" holiday tunes with Merry Christmas (I Don't Want To Fight Tonight) and The Kink's Father Christmas rounding us out. Both of these tracks are available on an unusual Christmas compilation called Little Steven's Christmas a Go-Go CD.




Two kickass rockumentaries I mentioned are It Might Get Loud and Under Great White Northern Lights on DVD. Both feature Jack White for those White Stripes lovin' friends.


Lastly, I felt Fear's Lee Ving would tie everything up nicely with his one-two punch 45 of Another Christmas Beer and Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas, proving even crusty ol' Punk Rock dudes can also sing a sweet melody.


I really hope you've enjoyed this off-the-beaten-path Holiday excursion, I had a blast putting it together. Hopefully you heard something "new to you" or just fist-pumped along to an old favorite. Join me on Christmas day proper for episode 6...what ever will it be about? Stay tuned, and thanks so much for listening! 

Book/Film Comparison: Somewhere In Time: Time Travel and Lost Love

Having just immersed myself in both the book and the film Somewhere In Time, I felt it was absolutely necessary to dedicate a post to them both. Incidentally, the original title for the book is Bid Time Return by the masterful Richard Matheson. The was changed for the film to make it more accessible, although I prefer the original (of course, don't I always??). However, I'm happy to report that Matheson also wrote the screenplay, which is why it translates so well to the big screen.


Now this is most definitely not the first time I had heard of, or seen the film. I've no doubt watched it at least a dozen times throughout the previous years. But this is the first time I had read the book, devouring it in a scant two days. At first, I didn't care for the choppy sentences, or the way Richard (our hero and main character) 'spoke'. Perhaps my seeing the film first so many times clouded my judgement there, I'm not sure. And there are several elements I didn't care for in the book, but I won't cloud your opinions with spoilers here.

Two fascinating things happened during this two-day immersion of book and film:


  • It rekindled my lifelong interest in time travel
  • It rekindled my admiration of Christopher Reeve, and what he brought to the role coming immediately off of Superman. 
Time travel has always interested me, and perhaps science will catch up with it someday. They now say that time travel to the future is possible, but not to the past. Hmm... All of our selfish desires aside, going back to the past would indeed be a wondrous, and most likely dangerous feat. One that we mere humans at our current stage of evolution could not begin to handle properly.

Christopher Reeve portrays Richard flawlessly. I found myself conducting a sort of character study of 'Richard', noting the changes he goes through after just the first sight of the photograph of Elise. These changes are subtle, yet significant, and differ slightly from those in the book. The sincerity with which Christopher plays Richard is so genuine, so believable, and very touching. The same can absolutely be said for Jane Seymour, as Elise. No one else could have played her so beautifully, and a lot has to be said for she and Christopher's chemistry--one that would last many years after the film. She has named one of her sons after him.

So for those who are rolling their eyes, scoffing at this 'gushy love story', let me enlighten you to a few things. It was a string of men who believed in this story so much and got it made into film. Everyone who worked on the film did so for less pay than they were accustomed to getting, for sheer love of the project. In fact, the music, which was so essential to the story line, was done by John Barry (Goldfinger, Midnight Cowboy, Dances with Wolves just to name a few) as a favor to Jane, his dear friend. A testament to the power of this 'gushy love story' had over many people.

Obviously, I cannot recommend the book and the film highly enough. Both are expertly executed, and make for great storytelling. The one thing I will say is perhaps to read the book and then see the film, if you have not already seen it. Heart wrenching, beautiful and an interesting idea of time travel and lost love. Don't forget to watch the wonderful documentary on the special features of the DVD. It will help give you a true sense of what it was like to make a film of this nature, in this time period. Just lovely.

Book Review: Less Than Zero & Imperial Bedrooms by Bret Easton Ellis


Less Than Zero Bret Easton Ellis
 Going in to Less Than Zero, I was not even aware that there was a sequel. But I had of course seen the 1987 film, and was really looking forward to reading the original story. I was not prepared, initially, for the melancholy tone of the book. But at around 100 pages in, I began to relish it. The tone and writing style reminded me of The Bell Jar, along with its easy to read format.

If you've only seen the film Less Than Zero, not much will be spoiled for you plot wise, as it's nothing like the book. Perhaps the overall mood is the same, and the film is beautifully shot. But you're in for an almost completely different story within the book. When I finished it, I wanted to know what happens to Clay after college, and was not left wondering long, having read shortly afterwards that there was indeed a sequel called Imperial Bedrooms. Read on...


Imperial Bedrooms Bret Easton EllisI did not have high hopes for Imperial Bedrooms, as I was left with a rather flat feeling after reading Less Than Zero. I understood what was different about Bret Easton Ellis' writing style, for it to have been so well received in 1985, but I just didn't find it that impressive. So going in to Imperial Bedrooms, I just thought I'll find out what happens to Clay, and it will be a quick read. The book is set (in real time) 25 years after the end of Less Than Zero.

A quick read indeed. I was able to finish it within 24 hours. Quite a feat for me, as I'm a busy lady and tend to be a bit of a slow reader. The first half of the book absolutely flew by, and I inhaled the first 100 pages in nothing flat. 25 years makes a good writer even better, at least one would hope, and this is certainly the case for B.E.E.

The second half of the book did not fare so well for me, I found it tedious and drawn out. The 'murder mystery' plot line running through it had become wearisome. Perhaps this is because Imperial Bedrooms was at first just a short story, later fleshed out to novella length. It shows. But that's just my non-expert opinion. That being said, I enjoyed it more than Less Than Zero, but I seem to be in the minority in that opinion. So read it for yourself and see which camp you're in.

Oh...one more thing...the event which occurs within the last 10 pages or so put me off my food. Perhaps that's just my sensitive nature, but you have been warned.